Make a Little Money Before a Lot of Money

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Contents

30 Best Ways to Make Money From Home – All Tried and Tested

Ideas to Make Money from Home

How can I make money from home? This is the question I asked myself expecting my second child ready to make that transition from my 9-5. I NEEDED to find a way to make money from home.

I was looking for the best ways to make money from home online but couldn’t find ANYTHING.

While continuing to look and realizing that there was nothing out there, I reached out to moms working from home and created this website to share their stories in an article I wrote on tried and true stay at home mom jobs.

I quickly realized I wasn’t alone and that there are others (not just moms) looking for ways to make money from home and want to know only three things:

  • Is the job legitimate (Can I see a success story from someone who does this today?)
  • How much can I make
  • How to get started

And that’s what I’m going to share with you today. So…

How to Make Money from Home

Use this list! In this article, I will share what I do along with several other ways you can make money from home and they pay well!

Make sure you subscribe to our mailing list as we update this list with additional ways to make money from home, save and invest. Click here to subscribe.

AND if you are you a mom, are you on Instagram? I’m starting to become more active again and I’d love to connect with moms who “get it”. It’s so much better going through this wonderful yet challenging journey of motherhood together. You can follow me here.

This list includes creative ways to make money, making money on the internet, and how to earn money from home without any investment.

Once you get to the bottom of this list I’ll also show you how to make extra money fast.

How to Make Money on the Internet

1. Blogging

Blogging is #1 on the list because it is one of the most flexible jobs you can have and the earning potential is limitless!

Blogging is one of my favorite forms of passive income because I make money just for people reading my articles from ads. I can assure you I did not write this article today, and yet it’s making me money.

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When you get a nice amount of people reading your articles, it brings in a nice income.

Here’s a screenshot of one of my monthly ad earnings:

I also make money by partnering with companies and becoming an “Affiliate”. You can see how I make money blogging here.

Keep in mind that you do not have to be an excellent writer if you want to blog. I’m definitely not, you just write like you talk.

I don’t want to make blogging sound easy because it’s not (in the beginning anyway), it takes a lot of work and a year before I made any money that mattered but it was soooo worth it. I was able to quit my corporate job and stay home with my kids.

I work about 15 hours per week now and earn much more than my corporate job.

How much can I make? I know bloggers making between $2,000-$100,000+ per MONTH (and I’m one of them).

How do I get started? Check out my step-by-step guide on how to start a blog from scratch along with the most popular niches that make the most money and get the most traffic.

2. Freelance Writer

Do you like to write? You can make a lot of money as a writer, I know because I interviewed Holly Johnson in my How to Become a Freelance Writer article who makes OVER $200,000 a year. I didn’t even know that was possible!

How much can I make? Holly Johnson said that she finds it hard for you NOT to earn AT LEAST $40,000 to $50,000 a year working full-time as a writer.

How do I get started? Holly Johnson found the secret sauce when it comes to writing and charging the right rate for your work. She created a free introductory training on how to build a six-figure writing career.

I highly recommend taking her course if you want to work from home writing and follow her path to success. I also have several ways to get writing gigs at the end of this article.

3. Proofreader

Do you find yourself easily catching errors when reading? Do you cringe when you see grammar mistakes? If so, you should consider becoming a Proofreader.

Proofreaders are NEEDED, I know because I use one myself.

How much can I make? Caitlin Pyle made $43,000 in a year working part-time! You can see her full story in my How to Become a Proofreader article. Many others are making between $1,000-$4,000 a month.

How do I get started? Take this FREE introductory workshop to help you learn the skills needed to start your own freelance proofreading hustle and see if this is the right career for you. Caitlin is also offering $150 off her paid course if interested until April 15th. Use this code at checkout: SKILLS

4. Virtual Bookkeeper

Bookkeepers record financial transactions for small business owners. I have an awesome interview with two moms who are now successful Virtual Bookkeepers who started with no previous experience.

One of the moms has nine kids, homeschool’s 6 and still has time to make a living as a Bookkeeper Part-time!! She makes over $2,000/mo.

You’ll have to check out the full interview in my How to Become a Bookkeeper article.

How much can I make? The Bookkeepers course (the course the moms took) teaches you how to charge $60 per hour for your service.

How do I get started? Check out this free training to determine if this is the right choice for you and it will show you how to get started.

5. Selling on Amazon (FBA program)

If you like shopping and searching for a good deal, you should definitely consider Amazon’s FBA program.

You find good deals on products at brick and mortar stores or online and resell them on Amazon for a higher price.

What makes Amazon’s FBA program so great is that THEY ship the products to your customers and handle the customer service!

How much can I make? This varies significantly and depends on how much work you are willing to put in, Jessica from the Selling family made OVER six figures her first year. Check out my awesome interview with her on How to Sell on Amazon.

How do I get started? Take this FREE 7-Day Email Course on how to start selling on Amazon. My sister recently took this course, and she’s selling products already!

6. Teach or Tutor

Online teaching is growing thanks to the advancements in technology, and it’s an excellent way to make money at home if you have teaching experience or knowledge of a specific subject.

I interviewed Brittney Sutton who makes $1,700 a month working only 2 hours a day for VIPKid, see the full interview in my How to Teach English Online article.

How much can I make? $10.50 – $60 per hour, check out these companies hiring now.

How do I get started? Apply to the best online tutoring jobs.

7. Social Media Manager

Are you active on Social Media and would like to post on behalf of other businesses? It’s important to be knowledgeable about the different Social Media platforms, and you will need great organizational and communication skills.

How much can I make? Depending on how many clients you have you could earn between $1,000-$10,000 a month.

How do I get started? Consider taking this highly recommended course and also check out my How to Become a Social Media Manager article to see how Nicole got started.

8. Virtual Assistant

Are you task-oriented and have skills in the areas of social media management, editing, graphic design, tutoring, researching, writing, administrative duties or data entry? Then becoming a Virtual Assistant may be an excellent choice for you.

How much can I make? You can earn $25-$100 an hour as a Virtual Assistant.

How do I get started? Gina Horkey, a Six-figure Virtual Assistant, I interviewed is offering her Virtual Assistant mini-course (priced at $99) for FREE during this time to help you learn how to become a Virtual Assistant while home.

Click here to access the free course and make sure you use the code: WEGOTTHIS

You will still need to put your credit card/PayPal information in the purchase section because this was the only way she could get it to work in this short time. They will NOT charge your account for anything.

9. Transcribe

Transcriptionists listen to audio files and record (type) what they hear. If you have patience and the ability to sit for long periods of time and an eye for detail, you should consider transcribing.

How much can I make? You can earn $7-$21 per hour or more if you start your own business transcribing.

How do I get started? Take this Free Mini-Course or check out these companies hiring along with a work at home success story from Kim (transcriber).

10. Virtual Receptionist

Answer calls and web chats for a variety of businesses and professionals for Smith.ai, working alongside a close-knit team from around the country.

Smith.ai operates Monday through Friday from 5:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. PT / 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. ET.

You must be available 4 hours a day, 5 days a week (minimum of 20 hours per week, 40 hours max). Shifts are broken into 2- to 5-hour blocks. Applicants will need to be from the US, Canada, or Mexico.

COMPENSATION & BENEFITS

Pay is hourly and starts at $10 per hour, with raises based on performance and longevity with the company.

Benefits include:

  • Medical, dental, and vision insurance
  • Retirement plans
  • Cash bonuses
  • Weekly pay

How do I get started? Apply Here

11. Life Coach

Do you love personal development and enjoy helping people? Do you want to build a business of your own? If that’s you, you should consider becoming a Life Coach.

How much can I make? It depends on your market. If you are targeting lower-income, you can charge $47 per hour, if you’re targeting higher income you could charge $297 per hour or much more.

It also depends on your model, are you doing 1-to-1 coaching or group coaching?

How do I get started: Check out my article on How to Become a Life Coach and consider this Life Coach Certificate Course.

12. Create an Online Store with Drop Shipping

Dropshipping is a method where you can sell third-party products from a Drop Shipping Company without ever seeing or shipping the item. When you make a sale, the product is shipped directly to the customer from the drop shipper.

Your profit is the difference between what you charge your customers and what the drop shipping company charges you.

How much can I make? This really depends on you and how much work you put into it, but you could make $10,000+ a month!

How do I get started? Theo McArthur has great success with dropshipping and created a course that teaches you how to launch your first profitable Dropship Website in 14 Days or less and grow your Income to $10,000 per month in profits.

13. Graphic Designer

If you have an eye for design and have experience in Adobe Creative Suite/Adobe Creative Cloud – including InDesign, Illustrator, or Photoshop, there is a profitable market out there for you.

How much can I make? You can charge $25-$300 per hour, depending on your experience.

How do I get started? Check out this highly recommended course Learn Photoshop, Web Design & Profitable Freelancing. Promote your services to your social network and create a website showcasing your services and work.

14. Become a Travel Agent

Do you love to travel and enjoy helping people? Consider working from home as a Travel Agent.

How much can I make? Glassdoor states the typical salary ranges from $29,000 to $58,000 a year, but it all depends on experience and number of clients.

How do I get started? You can either start your own business or work for an agency, Sarah B. who started her own Travel Agency tells us how to do both in my How to Become a Travel Agent article.

15. Search Engine/Social Media Evaluator

Search Engine/Social Media Evaluator rate social media ads and search engine results for relevancy.

This job is great because it does not require getting on the phone, you make your own schedule, and it does not require any training.

How much can I make? $12.50 – $14 per hour.

How do I get started? Apply to the only two companies I recommend in my How to Become a Web Search Evaluator article.

16. Customer Service Rep

Customer service positions typically provide product or service information. It is a growing trend to hire customer service reps remotely.

How much can I make? The pay ranges from $10-$21 per hour according to Glassdoor for the companies below with a rating of 4/5 star rating or higher:

How do I get started? Consider applying to the companies above and check out these job boards for an up-to-date list of available remote customer service positions such as FlexJobs, Indeed, and UpWork.

Creative Ways to Make Money

17. Get Into Real Estate BUT w/o Selling or Buying Anything

Yes, this really is a thing. I met Boss Mom Danielle Pierce who is doing this earning over $400,000 a year WHILE homeschooling her 3 kids!

It’s called Property Preservation or Repairing Foreclosed Homes. Danielle outsources 100% of the work and only does admin work.

How much can I make? It varies but Danielle says it’s very feasible to gross $100k+ or more in revenue within 18 months

How do I get started? Check out my interview with Danielle to see how it all works

18. Earn $30-$50 per hour Picking Up Trash

Yes, it’s true. You can make money picking up trash in parking lots for Commercial Real Estate Management companies.

I was privileged to interview Brian who earns $650,000 per year doing this! Check out my article to see how it works, how to get started, and how he’ll help you grow your business.

The beauty of this job is the service hours don’t interfere with a typical day job, so you can do this on the side and grow it however big or small as you want.

19. Flip Items from Flea Markets and Thrift Shops

Rob from the Flea Market Flipper is the MASTER flipper. He made over $130,000 flipping items from Flea Markets and thrift stores PART-TIME.

And, you don’t need to have a lot of money to start either. Rob recommends his students to start with a budget of $20-$50 to find items. Based on that, they should be able to make $100-$300 (mostly reselling on eBay) and then take some of the profit and do it again.

How do I get started? Rob created a free workshop to turn your passion for visiting thrift stores, yard sales, & flea markets into a profitable reselling business – in as little as 14 days. You can click here to sign up .

20. Clean Houses

Do you enjoy cleaning or just know it’s something you wouldn’t mind doing to make extra money? If so, you really should consider doing this because you could make a lot of money.

How much can I make: $1,000 per week working part-time

How do I get started: Check out my article on How to Start a Cleaning Business and get all the information you need to start today.

21. Rental Property Income

Have you ever thought about making a monthly passive income from a rental property(s)? My friend Dustin does this and was able to make enough monthly passive income from his properties to quit his 9-5.

Dustin created a FREE Real Estate Investing course to show you how to quit your J.O.B. and live the dream life.

22. Start a Baby Equipment Rental Business

Do you live in a popular tourist area? Did you know you could make a lucrative side hustle renting baby equipment to traveling families? I didn’t either, but I interviewed boss mom Ashley Anderson who made me a believer.

How much can I make? Ashley earns over $3,000 per month

23. Run a Speed Dating/Event Business

I know this is definitely not for everyone but I at least wanted to mention to those who may be interested. If you like the idea of hooking up couples you could start a Facebook page, find a venue and sell tickets.

Start with age ranges from 25-35 and 35-45 selling tickets from $10-$30 depending on the venue. Many bars or local restaurants may let you have the event for free on a weekday just to make some extra money with your event OR pay you to have the event at their venue.

It’s an easy business to run and a great way to make some extra money on the side.

23. Make Money with Your Amazon Alexa or Google Home

If you have one did you know you could make up to $100 per month using the Conversationally App?

Conversationally is a market research company and they need to gather real data to help companies like Google and Amazon improve their Voice Assistants, and they’ll pay us to get it. I use it and I love it.

Just use your Voice Assistant like you normally do and earn! You can see my full review of it here or you can easily click here to get started.

24. Earn $75 or more as an UpVoice Panelist

Get paid for the time you spend on Facebook, Instagram, Amazon, YouTube and more.

I did a full review of this site, and it’s literally one of the easiest ways to make money online. Currently only applicable to candidates in the United States.

25. Make Money off Your Change

Acorns is a neat way to start micro-investing. It rounds up your purchases to the nearest dollar and invests the difference on your behalf.

Acorns monitors your bank account and automatically invests the change from your daily purchases. For example, if you buy a coffee for $1.75, Acorns will round up to $2.00 and automatically invest $.25 in “smart portfolios”.

I made $60 without even noticing. There are no fees for withdrawing, just keep in mind that it may be more of a tax implication for the following year.

26. Make Money by Losing Weight

HealthyWage is a company supported by the Government to incentivize people to lose weight by putting their own money at risk with the potential to earn up to $10,000! It’s the ultimate losing weight challenge.

Here’s How it Works:

  • Start with the HealthyWage Prize Calculator. Enter how much weight you want to lose, how long you’ll take to lose it, and how much you want to bet a month for that period of time.
  • You can play around with the calculator until you get your desired prize amount. (up to $10,000)
  • Sign up and agree to pay the monthly amount for the duration of the challenge.
  • Achieve your weight-loss goal, and win your prize!

If you don’t hit your goal, your money goes to support HealthyWage, including prizes for others who achieve their goals.

Click here to See How Much Money You Can Make and see how Jaclyn won $5,294.12, and Anastasia won $10,000 here.

27. Interior Designer

Do you watch HGTV and think, I can do that, I want to do that? See how Boss Mom Julie Putzel got started and manages to earn a six-figure salary.

How much can I make? You can make anywhere from $50-$150 per hour as an Interior Decorator. Interior Designers income varies significantly, but you can make six-figures or more.

How do I get started? To become an Interior Decorator (this is different from Interior Designer) I recommend starting a website, take quality photos of your work, ask friends and family if you can work for them at no charge to help add to your portfolio, once you’ve created a polished visualization of your work you can then start to charge for your service.

To get started as an Interior Designer, find out how here.

28. Sell on Etsy

Do you consider yourself as artsy or crafty? Etsy is a great platform to turn your hobby into a thriving business. You can make crafts, printables, and more.

Printables are so great because you make them once and can earn money from them over and over again.

How much can I make? With Printables you can make $500-$1,000 per month. If you’re selling a craft that amount varies significantly. I did interview this mom of three who made $350,000 in one year.

How do I get started? See how these two women successfully make money off of printables and how you can too here.

29. In-Home Childcare

If you love children and have a passion for the opportunity to impact a young life, this is a great opportunity to work from home.

How much can I make? It really depends on where you live, but you could charge $30 a day which turns out to $600 a month (assuming its for 8 hours a day), while some daycares will charge $900 or more a month.

How do I get started? I recommend taking this neat course on How to Start a Home Daycare Business. Ladonna operated her own profitable home daycare and shows you how you can do the same, along with all the information you’ll need to get started.

30. Photography

If you’re the family photographer and love taking pictures, you should look into Photography as it is a great side income that could turn into something more.

My sister recently purchased the Canon EOS Rebel T6i Body, and she takes AMAZING pictures along with the Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 STM Lens which is a KEY component of taking quality photos. It is an investment that can pay off significantly.

How much can I make?

  • Wedding Photography -$700 – $3,500+
  • Senior Portrait Photography – $100-$300 a session
  • Small local businesses – $25 – $200 per image

How do I get started? Start taking pictures of any and everything, take classes and learn photoshop to polish off your photos and add quality finishes. Post your pictures to your social network and check out these two apps to make money from your phone taking pictures.

Bonus Tip – Make Money By Paying Your Bills On Time

Do you spend money on groceries, bills, clothes, gas, and entertainment? Of course, you do, so why not get a percentage of that money back?

My husband and I use one credit card on everything because the more you spend the more points you accumulate. We use the Chase Freedom credit card and had over $500 last year that we used on Christmas (cash and gift cards) and we’re back up to $654.15.

This is FREE Money. What’s the catch? Pay your bills on time. That’s the only way this works. As long as you don’t spend what you can’t afford, you win. This is a great form of passive income.

If you sign up for the Chase Freedom Credit card as we did you get a $150 bonus if you spend $500 within the first 3 months. That should be easy to do if you use it on everything like us.

How to earn money from home without any investment

31. Rent your Car for Ad space

This is for the true hustler who has no shame. You can have your car wrapped by Wrapify and make between $264-$452 a month with no upfront costs.

First, you’ll need to download the app, drive with the app, get matched with campaigns, and then you’ll take your car in to get wrapped and make money driving places you normally go. Easy passive income if you don’t mind your vehicle being wrapped.

32. Rent Out Your Space

Do you live in a prime location or have a room to spare? Consider making money with Airbnb.

Riley from Young and the Invested generates $400/month on average from his unit listed on Airbnb.

33. Dosh

Dosh is a money earning app that is COMPLETELY passive. I downloaded the app and linked my credit card, so every time I shop, eat, travel, and more at participating local and national merchants I get a percentage back.

I forgot I had this app, and I was out to dinner with my husband for our anniversary and received this email after we paid below

and this keeps happening when I use my credit card at participating merchants!

34. Ebates

I’m a big fan of the cashback site Ebates. It’s just like using a coupon, except all money is earned after the purchase has been successfully tracked.

I received $43 just for buying things I was going to purchase anyway.

Gotta love stuff this easy.

35. Ibotta

Ibotta allows you to get cash back for items you buy anyway. I LOVE this app.

Here’s How it Works:

  • Download the Ibotta App and before you shop, add offers on products you normally purchase anyway.
  • Buy the products you selected at any participating store. Don’t forget your receipt!
  • Redeem your offers by taking a photo of your receipt. Ibotta will match the items you bought to the offers you selected and give you the cash!

Your cash back will be deposited into your Ibotta account within 48 hours.

How to Make Extra Money Fast

36. Instacart

Make $100 a day or more by grocery shopping for others using the Instacart app. I did a full review of this app here and it’s definitely something to consider if you want some quick, easy money.

You can sign up here. I also have a number of other ways to make money driving in my Best Delivery Driver jobs article. Make up to $25 per hour!

37. Sign up for Research Studies – Up to $400 per study

You can make quick easy money by participating in research studies. Below are the best-paid companies to sign up for

  • Respondent – $50-$400 per study
  • User Interviews – $50-$100 per hour
  • Vindale Research – $10-$50 per day if you apply to multiple (you’ll have more opportunities for this one) participants are on a first-come, first served basis so be quick to apply if you see a good one.

38. Get Paid Taking Surveys Online ($50 -100 per month)

This may not be the most exciting way to make money, but it is one of the quickest and easiest ways to make money online. To make a lot of money with surveys, you’ll need to join many survey sites.

Before you start applying I highly recommend opening a new email account to direct all surveys to that account because you’ll be inundated with daily survey emails.

I only recommend applying to the following survey sites:

39. Get Paid to Test Apps and Websites

Companies need feedback on the user experience of their websites, and they’ll pay you to get it. This is a fast and easy way to make money online.

Here are two reputable companies to sign up for:

Final Thoughts

Did you see any jobs that may work for you? If not, check out FlexJobs. With FlexJobs, you can access hand-screened remote, part-time, freelance, and flexible jobs—quick and easy! Use my code FLEXLIFE for 30% off.

The normal fee each month would be $14.95 a month but it’s less using my code. I’m not a fan of paying to find work but I get they have to get compensated somehow for hand-screening each job they post.

Once you find a job you can cancel and if you don’t think it’s worth it, you can request a refund…so there’s no real risk.

Did you like this article? Be sure to subscribe to our mailing list and stay in the know about new ways to make money from home, save, and invest.

Английские идиомы о деньгах

Представляем Вам идиомы на английском языке о деньгах (Money idioms), с переводом на русский и примерами в употреблении.

back-of-the-envelope

a quick approximate calculation done informally

предварительный, черновой, приблизительный; спешный

I did some back-of-the-envelope calculations as I didn’t need the exact amount. — Я сделал некоторые предварительные расчёты, поскольку мне не нужна была точная сумма.

balance the books

to ensure that the figures regarding credit and debit are correct

вывести сальдо, подвести итог (подвести итоги по данным в бухгалтерских книгах и вывести сальдо по балансу в конце отчетного периода)

Remember to balance the books at the end of your accounting year. — Не забудь подвести итоги по балансу в конце отчетного периода.

ballpark figure

to give an approximate number or a rough estimate of the cost of something

ориентировочная цифра, примерное число, количество, хороший приблизительный подсчет; приблизительная оценка

I’d say five hundred dollars, but that’s a ballpark figure. — Я бы сказал, пятьсот долларов, но это лишь приблизительная оценка.

bet your bottom dollar

to be absolutely certain of something

гарантировать что-то, не сомневаться, спорить на что угодно, дать голову на отсечение

I’d bet my bottom dollar that he will be on time. — Голову даю на отсечение, что он будет вовремя.

bring home the bacon

supply material support

преуспеть, добиться успеха, зарабатывать на хлеб с маслом

You’ve got to get to work if you’re going to bring home the bacon. — Ты должен начать работать, если хочешь добиться успеха.

burn your fingers

to suffer financially as a result of foolish behaviour

обжечься на (чем-л.), поплатиться за непрошенное вмешательство, страдать от последствий своего действия

Jim got his fingers burnt playing poker. — Джим прогорел, играя в покер.

cash cow

a dependable source of money; a good investment

When we purchased stock in that company, we never expected it to become such a cash cow. — Когда мы купили акции в той компании, мы не ожидали, что это станет надежным источником дохода.

cheap skate

A stingy person

мелкая душонка; скряга

Mike is a real cheap skate when it comes to tipping. — Майк настоящий скряга, когда доходит до чаевых.

cook the books

to keep false financial records for an organization

фабриковать (стряпать) бухгалтерские книги, сознательно подтасовывать, фальсифицировать бухгалтерские данные для создания неправильного впечатления о делах компании, нечестная, «черная» бухгалтерия, когда результаты или отчетные данные специально подтасов

I wish she didn’t cook the books! — Жаль, что она подделывала счета!

cost an arm and a leg

to be very expensive

This car costs us an arm and a leg! — Это авто стоит очень дорого!

deep pocket

I need a friend with deep pockets! — Мне нужен богатый друг.

from rags to riches

from poverty to wealth

After I inherited the money, I went from rags to riches. — После того, как я унаследовал деньги, я поднялся из грязи в князи.

go Dutch

to pay for himself or herself in a pair or a group

платить за себя, разделить счет пополам

It is not considered a date if you go Dutch. — Это не свидание, если каждый платит за себя.

gravy train

a job that brings in a steady supply of easy money

тёпленькое местечко, лёгкий заработок, доходное место, выгодное

This kind of job is a real gravy train. — Здесь выгодно работать — доходное место.

have an eye to the main chance

look or be looking for an opportunity to take advantage of a situation for personal gain, to be ready to use a situation to your own advantage

преследовать личные цели, стремиться к деньгам

He was a developer with an eye on the main chance. — Он был программистом, преследовавшим корыстные цели.

hit pay dirt

to be lucky and suddenly find yourself in a successful money-making situation, to discover something of value

Karl tried a number of different jobs until he hit pay dirt. — Карл перепробовал кучу работ, пока нашел что-то стоящее.

ill-gotten gains

things that someone has obtained in a dishonest or illegal way

деньги, добытые нечестным путём; нечестная прибыль

Ben cheated at cards and as a result is now living on his ill-gotten gains. — Бен жульничал, играя в карты, и сейчас живет на нечестно заработанные деньги.

it’s a steal

to get an item or thing for a very low price

это выгодное предложение, это почти даром

At this price it’s a steal. — При такой цене — это почти даром.

keep the wolf from the door

to have enough money to buy food and other essentials

Your new job pays just enough money to keep the wolf from the door. — Твоя новая работа приносит тебе столько денег, что хватает лишь на кусок хлеба.

keep your head above water

keep your head above water

оставаться на плаву; преодолевать сложности (особенно финансовые)

His mineral water business has been slow, but he’s managed to keep his head above water. — Его бизнес минеральной воды идет медленно, но он остается на плаву.

laugh all the way to the bank

to be earning a lot of money easily, to make a lot of money easily, especially through someone else’s stupidity, to have made a substantial amount of money either by lucky investment or by some fraudulent deal and rejoice over one’s gains

If you do what I suggest, you can be laughing all the way to the bank. — Если сделаете, как я предлагаю, окажетесь в выигрыше.

live beyond means

to spend more money than you earn or can afford

жить не по средствам; тратить больше, чем можно себе позволить

If you hadn’t lived beyond your means, you wouldn’t be in serious financial difficulty now. — Если бы ты не жила не по средствам, то не испытывала бы сейчас финансовые трудности.

live from hand to mouth

not to have any money to save because whatever you earn is spent on food and other essentials

жить бедно; едва сводить концы с концами

Unfortunately, most families in that area live from hand to mouth. — К сожалению, большинство семей в этом районе живут бедно.

live in clover

to have enough money to lead a very comfortable life, to live a luxurious and comfortable life

как сыр в масле кататься; жить припеваючи, без забот

Everyone knows that they’ve been living in clover. — Все знают, что они живут без забот.

loan shark

a person who lends money at extremely high interest rates to people who are unable to obtain a loan from the bank.

«кредитная акула», ростовщик (юридическое или физическое лицо, которое выдает кредиты под проценты, превышающие установленный законом максимум)

I am afraid I will be late paying back money to a loan shark. — Боюсь, что не выплачу вовремя кредит ростовщику.

lose your shirt

to lose all your money or possessions, especially as a result of speculation or gambling

If it weren’t for me, you’d lose your shirt. — Если бы не я, ты бы разорился.

make a killing

great financial success

Ariel made a killing on the real estate market when she was 35. — В 35 Ариэль заработала много денег на рынке недвижимости.

make ends meet

have very little money

едва сводить концы с концами

My salary is so low that I find it hard to make ends meet. — Моя зарплата такая низкая, что я еле свожу концы с концами.

money burns a hole in your pocket

to be eager to spend money quickly or extravagantly

деньги жгут карман; деньги у кого-либо, которые не лежат подолгу; деньги, которые тратятся сразу, как получаются

As soon as I am paid I go shopping — money burns a hole in my pocket! — Как только я получаю деньги, сразу иду тратить — деньги у меня не задерживаются!

money for old rope

money or reward earned for little or no effort, a very quick and easy way to earn money

For me, teaching kids roller blading is money for old rope. — Учить детей кататься на роликах — лёгкий хлеб для меня.

nest egg

money saved for the future

деньги, отложенные на чёрный день; первая сумма, отложенная для какой-л. определённой цели

it is difficult for young couples to build a nest egg. — Молодым парам сложно откладывать деньги.

not for love or money

not to do anything under any circumstances

ни за что на свете, ни за какие коврижки

I would not try diving for love or money! — Я бы ни за что на свете не попробовал дайвинг!

on a shoestring

for very little money; on a tight budget

на медные деньги, со скудными средствами

When we were students we lived on a shoestring. — Будучи студентами, мы были очень ограничены в средствах.

on one’s uppers

poor, in reduced circumstances, extremely short of money

быть без гроша, быть в стесненных обстоятельствах, ходить в стоптанных башмаках

I gave him an advance in salary as I knew he was clearly on his uppers. — Я заплатил ему больше, так как знал, что он на мели.

on the breadline

very poor indeed, have a very low income or barely enough money to survive

There are more people on the breadline than ever before. — Сейчас больше бедных, чем раньше.

on the house

at the management’s expense, free, given away free by a merchant

за счёт заведения (о подаваемой выпивке, еде)

The owner offered us a drink on the house. — Владелец предложил нам бесплатную выпивку.

pay over the odds

pay too much or you pay more for something than it is really worth

She’s willing to pay over the odds for this book. — Она готова переплатить за эту книгу.

pick up the tab

pay for something, to pay the bill

I want them to pick up the tab for all moving expenses. — Я хочу, чтоб они оплатили переезд.

play the market

to buy stocks and shares in the hope of making a profit when you sell them.

играть, спекулировать на бирже, проводить спекулятивные операции на бирже путем покупки или продажи активов с целью получения прибыли от разницы в ценах

It’s more risky to play the market at the present time. — В настоящее время рисковано играть на бирже.

pretty penny

a sizable amount of money

He paid a pretty penny for that ring. — Это кольцо обошлось ему в кругленькую сумму.

rake in the money

to make money in large quantities

My business is so successful — I’m raking in the money. — Мой бизнес такой успешный — я гребу деньги лопатой!

rob Peter to pay Paul

take something away from one person to pay another, to pay one debt with money borrowed from someone else, thus creating another debt

If we take his money, we will still be in debt — there’s no point in robbing Peter to pay Paul. — Если мы возьмем его деньги, мы по-прежнему будем в долгах — нет смысла брать в долг, чтоб потом опять быть должным.

saddle sb with sth

to cause (someone or something) to have (a problem, burden, responsibility)

If I buy such an expensive house, I’m afraid I can be saddled with debt for many years. — Если я куплю такой дорогой дом, я, боюсь, обременю себя долгами на много лет.

scrimp and save

to spend as little as possible over a certain period of time in order to save money

экономить каждую копейку, бережливо расходовать деньги

She had to scrimp and save for her education. — Ей приходилось экономить деньги на обучение.

slush fund

an account or fund in politics or business where money is set aside for various unofficial purposes, often unethical or even illegal

«смазочный фонд», свободные средства, образовавшиеся на каком-л. из счетов компании или другой организации, используемые для выплаты небольших поощрений работникам, средства, предназначенные для взяток влиятельным людям

Nobody knew that this money came from a slush fund. — Никто не знал, что эти деньги были взяты из специальных свободных средств.

suit every pocket

the amount of money you are able to spend or the price you can afford

на любой вкус, по запросам любого, для любого кошелька

They offer a wide range of telephones at prices to suit every pocket. — Они предлагают широкий ассортимент телефонов для каждого.

to have an itching (itchy) palm

greedy for money, a desire for money, greed, wanting a bribe

быть алчным, жадным до денег, жлобство, руки загребущие (а глаза завидущие)

The bellboys in that hotel seem always to have itching palms. — Прислуга в этом отеле только и ждет, чтоб урвать побольше чаевых.

to make a fortune

to acquire great wealth by one’s own efforts

He made his fortune mass-producing the new model. — Он заработал своё состояние благодаря массовому производству новой модели.

to splash out

to buy something even though it costs a lot of money, spend money freely

I can’t afford to splash out on a new car. — Я не могу позволить себе раскошелиться на новую машину.

to work for peanuts

to work for very little money

I can’t work for peanuts anymore. — Я не могу больше работать за гроши.

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Few, a few, little, a little – упражнения на употребление в английском языке

Предлагаю вам подборку несложных упражнений на отработку правил употребления few и a few / little и a little в английском языке. Ко всем упражнениям есть ответы в конце статьи.

Если вам нужно повторить правило – сделать это можно здесь.

Если же необходимо просто освежить в памяти – воспользуйтесь этой инфографикой.

Также в конце статьи вы найдете 2 небольших теста по 10 вопросов в каждом на проверку темы few, a few, little, a little.

Упражнения (Exercises) на употребление few, a few, little, a little

Упражнение 1. Укажите правильный вариант – few или a few.

  1. A few/few people swim in the sea in the winter.
  2. He went out a few/few minutes ago.
  3. Can I speak to you for a few/few minutes?
  4. There were a few/few guests at the party. The hosts were unhappy.
  5. I’m going shopping. I need to buy a few/few things for tonight’s party.

Упражнение 2. Укажите правильный вариант – little или a little.

  1. I need a little/little Can you lend me some?
  2. I can’t wait for you. I’ve got a little/little
  3. You have a little/little time to finish the test. You must write faster.
  4. I have a little/little free time for hobbies because I work a lot.
  5. You don’t have to hurry. There is alittle/little traffic at this time of the day.
  6. There is a little/little snow on the ground. The children can’t make a snowman.

Упражнение 3. Вставьте few или a few

  1. Susan has ________ friends. She doesn’t feel lonely.
  2. You have _________ mistakes in the test. Correct them!
  3. There are ________ puddles on the road. Let’s put on rubber boots.
  4. _______ apples are enough for me not to feel hungry.
  5. We will come back in __________ days.
  6. The weather was bad, but ________people came.
  7. I really need to see him. I’ve got …………… questions to ask him.

Упражнение 4. Вставьте little или a little.

  1. There is ________ bread in the cupboard. It’s enough for dinner.
  2. The bottle was not empty. ________ water was left.
  3. Would you like _________ water?
  4. There is still _________ bread left.
  5. Can I have _________ milk in my coffee? I like white.
  6. There is still _________ work to do.

Упражнение 5. Вставьте a few or a little.

  1. There are only _________ biscuits left.
  2. There is ________ traffic here.
  3. It’s winter, but we still have ________ flowers in the garden.
  4. There were _________ taxis in front of the station.
  5. Can I have_________ pepper, please?
  6. She can give us_______ help.
  7. Put ______ salt and mix the ingredients.
  8. There are ______ bottles on the table.

Упражнение 6. Выберите правильный вариант ответа в тестовом задании.

  1. I eat _______ meat. I prefer fish. (A – very few / B – a few / C — very little)
  2. There are ________apples on the plate. Take one (A – a few / B – a lot / C — a little)
  3. There is ______ milk in the fridge. Can you buy some? (A – a few / B – a little / C — little)
  4. Very _______ pupils in our class can do such difficult sums. (A – few / B – a few / C — little)
  5. There is _______ furniture in the house; it’s almost empty. (A – a few / B – a little / C — little)

Упражнение 7. Вставьте few, a few, little, a little.

  1. Would you like some beer? Just_______ please.
  2. If you want to make pancakes, you need _______ eggs and _______ flour.
  3. Would you like _______ more rice?
  4. I bought _______ newspapers.
  5. I’d like to drink _______ coffee.
  6. This boy isn’t very popular at school. He’s got very _______ friends

Проверочные тесты на тему few и a few / little и a little (2 варианта).

Вариант 1. Вставьте few, a few, little, a little.

  1. There are______ hotels in this town. There is almost nowhere to stay for the tourists.
  2. Have you got ______ minutes? I need to talk to you.
  3. Could you buy ______ bottles of water for me?
  4. We had ______ snow last winter. We made snowmen.
  5. We have______ tomatoes, we can’t cook tomato-soup.
  6. The professor spends ______ time in company. He likes to be alone.
  7. They have ______ furniture in the room. The room is almost empty.
  8. I want to eat ______ I’m hungry.
  9. We saw ______ people at the restaurant because the prices there were very high.
  10. This is a modern town. There are only ______ old buildings.

Вариант 2. Вставьте few, a few, little, a little.

  1. My parents give me ______ pocket money every week, so I can buy everything I need.
  2. All we need is ______
  3. ______ animals can survive in the desert.
  4. Could we have ______ champagne, please?
  5. They’ve already been to Spain for ______ days.
  6. At home, the kitchen was a pleasant place. There were always ______ flowers in pots.
  7. ‘How’s your father ?’ ‘ ______ better, thanks.’
  8. ‘Sandra is fluent in Italian, French and Spanish.’ ‘It’s quite rare, ______ people can speak several foreign languages.’
  9. Can you please buy _______ apples.
  10. I only need ______ minutes to get ready.

Ответы к упражнениям и тестовым заданиям.

Exercise 1. 1 – few, 2 — a few, 3 — a few, 4 — few, 5 — a few

Exercise 2. 1 – a little, 2 – little, 3 – little, 4 – little, 5 – little, 6 — little

Exercise 3. 1 – a few, 2 – a few, 3 – a few, 4 – a few, 5 – a few, 6 – a few, 7 – a few

Exercise 4. 1 – a little, 2 – a little, 3 – a little, 4 a little, 5 – a little, 6 – a little

Exercise 5. 1 – a few, 2 – a little, 3 – a few, 4 – a few, 5 – a little, 6 – a little, 7 – a little, 8 – a few

Exercise 6. 1 – c, 2 – a, 3 – с, 4 – a, 5 — c

Exercise 7. 1 – a little, 2 – a few / a little, 3 – a little, 4 a few, 5 a little, 6 few

Ответы к тесту

Вариант 1

1 – few, 2 a few, 3 a few, 4 a little, 5 few, 6 little, 7 little, 8 a little, 9 few, 10 a few

Вариант 2

1 – a little, 2 – a little, 3 few, 4 a little, 5 a few, 6 a few, 7 a little, 8 few, 9 a few, 10 – a few

Вот и все. Надеюсь, вам понравились эти упражнения на употребления few и a few / little и a little в английском языке.

Понравилось? Сохраните на будущее и поделитесь с друзьями!

6 Комментариев для “Few, a few, little, a little – упражнения на употребление в английском языке”

Зачем вы в упражнении 3 и 4 запихнули только единственный вариант ответа? Это абсолютно не логично.

Ну вот чтобы вы засомневались.

Здравствуйте, в 5-м упражнении в первом предложении «There are only _________ biscuits left.» должно стоять «few». Т.к. few — это мало, недостаточно. А в предложении есть слово «only», у нас осталось только чуть-чуть печенок, недостаточно.

Добрый день. Верный ответ a few — только несколько, а не только мало (так будет звучать ваш вариант с few)

В варианте 2 теста (самое последнее упражнение),в 5) They’ve already been to Spain for ______ ,у Вас дан ответ a few. Это будет верным,если в конце добавить слово days. В таком виде- a little

Money Idioms

– more than average, above normal, more than the face value of a bond or stock or currency

The currency was selling above par at the small exchange shop.

– money when it is viewed as more important than anything else

The man spent most of his life chasing the almighty dollar.

– to pay money, to produce a necessary amount of money

I had to ante up a lot of money to get my car fixed.

as phony as a three-dollar bill

– phony, not genuine

The man who was asking for donations for the charity was as phony as a three-dollar bill.

as poor as a church mouse

The young mother is as poor as a church mouse and she has little money to feed her family.

as sound as a dollar

– very secure and dependable

The company president believes that his business is as sound as a dollar.

– at a higher price than usual because of something special

The tickets for the final basketball game were selling at a premium.

– at any expense of time or effort or money

We plan to send our child to a good school at all costs.

back on one`s feet

– to return to good financial health

My sister is back on her feet after losing her job last year.

balance the books/accounts

– to make sure that all money is accounted for by using generally accepted accounting methods

The small business owner works very hard to balance the books of her company.

– lower than average, below normal, less than the face value of a bond or stock or currency

The government bonds were selling at a price that was below par.

bet on the wrong horse

– to base one`s plans on a wrong guess about the results of something

We are betting on the wrong horse if we continue to support the other candidate for mayor.

bet one`s bottom dollar

– to bet all that one has on something because you are sure that you will win

I would bet my bottom dollar that the accounting manager will be late again today.

beyond one’s means

– more than one can afford

The young man was living beyond his means before he got his first job.

born with a silver spoon in one`s mouth

– to be born to wealth and comfort, to be born rich

The new student in our class was born with a silver spoon in his mouth and has had an easy life.

– one`s last dollar

The man spent his bottom dollar on some new clothes to wear for his job interview.

– the line in a financial statement that shows net income or loss

The bottom line in the company’s financial statement was much worse than expected.

– the final result, the main point

The bottom line was that we were unable to attend the conference because of our busy schedule.

– to reach the lowest point

The value of the company’s stock has recently appeared to bottom out.

bread and butter

– one’s income, the source of someone’s food

The man’s business is his bread and butter and he works very hard to make it successful.

– to have income equal to expenses

Our company was able to break even after only six months of operation.

– to win all the money at a casino gambling table, to use all of one’s money

The man broke the bank at the casino and walked away with much money.

bring home the bacon

– to earn the family living, to earn a salary

I have been working hard all month bringing home the bacon for my family.

burn a hole in one`s pocket

– to stimulate someone to spend money quickly

The money was burning a hole in the man’s pocket when he decided to go to the casino.

buy off (someone) or buy (someone) off

– to give money to someone to stop them from doing their duty

The man tried to buy off the politician but the politician refused to agree to the plan.

buy (something) for a song

– to buy something cheaply

I was able to buy my first house for a song.

– by using a check

I paid for the hotel room by check.

can take (something) to the bank

– a statement is true, something is guaranteed to be successful

I believe that we can take the new business plan to the bank.

– selling something for cash only and with no delivery

We were able to get a good price on a sofa in a cash-and-carry deal at the furniture store.

cash in (something) or cash (something) in

– to exchange coupons or bonds for their value in money

I cashed in my savings bonds in order to get some money to buy a car.

cash in on (something)

– to make money from an opportunity

The former basketball player cashed in on his popularity to open a very successful restaurant.

cash in one`s chips

– to exchange or sell something to get some money (from the chips used in a poker game)

I decided to cash in my chips and go back to school.

cash on the barrelhead

– money paid in cash when something is bought

I gave the salesman cash on the barrelhead for the used car.

– to not have enough money when you need it

I was caught short and had to borrow some money from my father last week.

– a person who will not spend much money, a stingy person

My friend is a cheapskate and will not go to a movie with me.

– a small amount of money

The amount of money that I paid for the used car was chicken feed.

– to contribute money for something, to pay jointly for something

Everybody in our office chipped in some money to buy a wedding present for our boss.

chisel (someone) out of (something)

– to cheat someone to get money or something

The criminal tried to chisel the small business owner out of much money.

– to make a lot of money, to make a big profit

I cleaned up at the horse races last year and I still have some of the money left.

closefisted (with money)

– to be very stingy with money

The man is closefisted with money and will not spend it.

– cash or coins or bills

I paid for the stereo in cold hard cash.

control the purse strings

– to be in charge of the money in a business or a household

My sister controls the purse strings in her family.

cook the books/accounts

– to illegally change information in the accounting books in a company, to write down false numbers in the accounting books in a company

The accountant was cooking the books for more than one year before he was caught.

cost a pretty penny

– to cost a lot of money

It is going to cost a pretty penny to get my car fixed.

cost an arm and a leg

– to cost a lot of money

My new television cost an arm and a leg.

cross (someone’s) palm with silver

– to give money to someone in payment for a service

We had to cross the apartment manager’s palm with silver in order to rent the apartment.

cut one’s losses

– to reduce one’s losses of money or something else

The owners decided to sell the soccer team in order to cut their losses.

cut (someone) a check

– to write a check (usually used for a company which automatically produces a check with a computer)

The company cut me a check to pay for my extra work.

cut (someone) off without a penny

– to stop giving someone a regular amount of money, to leave someone no money in a will

The wealthy businessman cut his son off without a penny when the young man refused to work hard.

– a price that is lower than usual

We went to a cut-rate furniture store to buy some new furniture for our apartment.

– a person who never pays the money that he or she owes

Recently, the government is trying to solve the problem of deadbeat fathers who do not support their families.

– easy to get and therefore of little value

Used computers are a dime a dozen and they have little value.

The land was dirt cheap when we bought it.

dollar for dollar

– considering the cost

Dollar for dollar the new hotel is the best bargain in this city for tourists.

– having no money

My friend was down-and-out for many years before he got a job.

– (for money) to earn interest while it is on deposit at a bank

We put the money into our bank account so that it would draw interest.

– a situation where each person pays his or her own share of the expenses

The movie was a Dutch treat so I did not have to pay for my date.

– money that you do not need to work hard to get

I was able to make some easy money from my job during the summer.

– the value or price printed on a stamp or bond or paper money

The face value of the stamp was very low but it was worth a lot of money.

– money that is earned quickly and easily (and sometimes dishonestly)

The company tried to make a fast buck on the property but actually they lost a lot of money.

– to contribute money to a special collection

Everybody had to feed the kitty in order to collect money for the party.

feel like a million dollars/bucks

– to feel wonderful, to feel well and healthy

Although I have been sick for a few weeks I feel like a million dollars today.

– to have no money at all

I am flat broke and do not have enough money to pay my rent.

– to get a loan, to arrange for a loan

I decided to float a loan to get some money to buy a car.

a fool and his money are soon parted

– if a person acts unwisely with money he or she will soon lose it

A fool and his money are soon parted and when the young man got the money from his father he soon spent it.

– to pay for something

My sister will foot the bill for her daughter’s education if she decides to go to university.

– at a low price, cheaply

We bought the car for a song and will use it on our holidays.

(not) for love or money

– not for anything, not for any price (usually used in the negative)

I would not want to have that man’s job for love or money.

– used before you say something to show that it is your opinion

“For my money, I believe that the new company policy will not be successful.”

– for very little money

The man had no money and was willing to work for peanuts.

fork out money (for something) or fork money out (for something)

– to pay for something

I had to fork out much money to get my car fixed.

fork over (some money) or fork (some money) over

– to pay money for something

I forked over much money for the painting that is hanging on my wall.

– (to own something) completely and without owing any money

Our neighbor owns his house free and clear.

from rags to riches

– from poverty to wealth

The man went from rags to riches with his hard work.

get a run for one’s money

– to receive a challenge, to receive what one deserves

The man got a run for his money when he decided to volunteer for the cleaning project.

get along on a shoestring

– to be able to live on very little money

The woman was forced to get along on a shoestring when she was a student.

get one’s money’s worth

– to get everything (or even a little more) that one has paid for

We got our money’s worth when we were able to spend the day at the water park.

give (someone) a blank check

– to let someone act as they want or as they think is necessary (like a check that has the amount left blank)

The city gave the new department a blank check to try and solve the homeless problem.

give (someone) a run for their money

– to give someone a challenge, to give someone what they deserve

The young candidate for the city park board gave the more experienced candidate a run for his money during the election.

– to lose all of one`s money, to become bankrupt

My uncle started a company last year but it quickly went broke.

– to share in the cost of a meal or some other event

We decided to go Dutch when we went to the restaurant for dinner.

go to the expense (of doing something)

– to pay the cost of doing something

I do not want to go to the expense of buying a new sofa for our apartment.

– the current rate

The going rate for used bicycles is not very much.

– a job or some work that pays more than it is worth

The job was a gravy train and I made a lot of money when I worked there.

grease (someone`s) palm

– to pay for a special favor or for extra help, to bribe someone

We had to grease the palm of the hotel manager to get a room.

– a gift of money (usually from the government)

The bus company has received many handouts from the government.

– to not have much money

The man is always hard up for money and he often wants to borrow some.

have an itchy/itching palm

– to ask for tips or money

The hotel clerk has an itchy palm and he is always asking for money.

have money to burn

– to have very much money, to have more money than is needed

My aunt has money to burn and she is always travelling somewhere.

have one’s hand in the till

– to be stealing money from a company or an organization

The clerk had her hand in the till so we decided to fire her.

have sticky fingers

The new employee has sticky fingers and many things in the store have disappeared.

have the Midas touch

– to have the ability to make money easily (King Midas turned everything that he touched into gold)

My uncle has the Midas touch and every business that he starts makes a lot of money.

(not) have two cents to rub together

– to not have much money

My friend does not have two cents to rub together and he is always broke.

He who pays the piper calls the tune.

– the person who pays for something has control over how the money is used

He who pays the piper calls the tune and the owner of the sports team can decide who will play on the team.

head over heels in debt

– to be deeply in debt

My cousin is head over heels in debt and has no money at all.

– the face of a coin or the other side of the coin

The referee threw the coin to see if it would be heads or tails.

– the charging of a high price for something

The amount of money that the company is charging for its services is highway robbery.

– to make a valuable discovery, to find the dirt in which much gold is found

We hit pay dirt when we got the rights to distribute the new product.

hit the jackpot

– to make a lot of money suddenly (usually from gambling)

We hit the jackpot at the casino and came home with much money.

honor (someone’s) check

– to accept someone’s personal check

The bank refused to honor my check for the apartment rent.

– money acquired in a dishonest or illegal manner

The ill-gotten gains of the politician were the subject of a large government inquiry.

– in a very good financial situation

My aunt and uncle have been in clover since my uncle got his new job.

The man is in debt and owes much money to many people.

– in goods rather than money

I paid for the work on my car in kind rather than with cash.

– to be profitable, to make money

Our company has been in the black since it started.

– with much money, wealthy

My grandfather was in the chips after they discovered oil on his farm.

– to be in debt, to owe money

I think that we are now in the hole and our business is having trouble.

– to be wealthy, to suddenly get a lot of money

I am in the money now that I won the lottery.

– to be unprofitable, to be losing money, to be in debt

The company has been in the red for several months now and may soon go bankrupt.

jack up the price (of something)

– to raise the price of something

The store jacked up the prices of their summer stock at the beginning of the summer.

– to keep records of money that is earned and spent

Our accountant is keeping careful books of all the transactions in the company.

keep the wolf from the door

– to earn enough money to maintain oneself at a minimal level of existence

My job does not pay very well but it is enough to keep the wolf from the door.

– money paid illegally for favorable treatment

The politician received several illegal kickbacks and he was forced to resign.

last of the big spenders

– a humorous way to describe someone who spends a lot of money for something (although he or she may not want to spend it)

The man is pretending to be the last of the big spenders as he spends money during his holidays.

I am trying hard to lay away enough money to buy a car.

– to spend or pay money

I had to lay out a lot of money to get my car fixed so now I do not have much money.

– a plan in which one pays some money as a downpayment and then pays a little more when one is able and the store holds the goods until the full price is paid

We bought our furniture on the layaway plan at the store.

let the buyer beware

– let the person who buys something check to see if the product is in good condition or has no problems

Consumers of electronic products should remember the motto of “let the buyer beware,” when they buy something.

live beyond one’s means

– to spend more money than you can afford

The girl is living beyond her means and will soon have some serious financial problems.

live from hand to mouth

– to live on little money

My friend has been living from hand to mouth and is now using his savings from his previous job.

live high off/on the hog

– to have the best of everything, to live in great comfort

My mother and father have been living high off the hog since they won the lottery.

live within one’s means

– to spend no more money than one has

I try very hard to live within my means so that I do not have any financial pressure.

– to have lots of money

My uncle is loaded and has lots of money.

look like a million dollars

– to look very good

The woman looked like a million dollars when she went to accept the award.

lose money hand over fist

– to lose money fast and in large amounts

The new coffee shop is losing money hand over fist.

lose one`s shirt

– to lose all or most of one`s money

I lost my shirt in a small business and now I have no money.

(not) made of money

– to not have a lot of money (usually used in the negative to say that you do not have enough money for something)

I am not made of money and I do not like wasting it on stupid things.

I am working hard trying to make a buck.

make a bundle/pile

– to make a lot of money

I made a bundle on the stock market and decided to buy a house.

make a check out to (someone)

– to write a check with someone’s name on it

I made a check out to the man who repaired my bathroom.

make a fast/quick buck

– to make money with little effort

The young man is very lazy and he is always trying to make a fast buck.

– to make a large amount of money

My sister made a killing when she worked overseas in the oil industry.

– to earn enough money to live

The man works hard to make a living and support his family.

make an honest buck

– to make an honest living

The man has always made an honest buck with his work.

– to make a lot of money

My friend is making big bucks at his company.

– to have enough money to pay one`s bills and other expenses

I have been having trouble making ends meet because the rent for my apartment is very high.

make good money

– to earn a large amount of money

My friend makes good money at his new job.

make money hand over fist

– to make money fast and in large amounts

My cousin has been making money hand over fist with her business.

money burns a hole in (someone’s) pocket

– someone spends money very quickly, someone is stimulated to spend money quickly

The money is burning a hole in my pocket and I want to spend it.

money doesn’t grow on trees

– money is valuable and you should not waste it

Money doesn’t grow on trees and it is necessary to work hard and manage it well.

money is no object

– it does not matter how much something costs

Money is no object and I plan to stay in the best hotels during my holiday.

(one’s) money is on (someone)

– you think that someone will win a competition or sports event etc.

My money is on the young horse that is racing for the first time today.

money is the root of all evil

– money causes most problems or wrongdoings in life

Many people believe that money is the root of all evil and that it causes people many problems.

– money gives one the power to get or do what he or she wants

Money talks and when I go to a restaurant with my rich uncle we always get very good service.

– the money that someone has saved up

I made a nest egg when I was working and I am now able to go to school.

nickel and dime (someone)

– to charge many small amounts of money (which eventually equal a large amount of money)

The small repairs on my car are beginning to nickel and dime me.

not for love nor money

– not for anything (no matter what the amount or price)

I will not meet with that woman again for love nor money.

– with an amount of money that you can or want to spend for something

The man has no job and is now on a budget.
The university student is on a budget.

– in a very small space

I had to turn my car on a dime after I entered the parking lot.

on a shoestring

– with little money to spend, on a very low budget

My cousin started his business on a shoestring but now it is very successful.

– using credit to buy something

I bought the new stereo on credit.

– for sale at a discounted price

The DVD’s were on sale when I bought them.

– paid for by the owner of a business

All of the drinks at the restaurant were on the house.

– exactly the right place or time or amount of something, exactly the right idea

Our estimate of next year’s budget is right on the money.

– to be accepting bribes

The agent at the border crossing seems to be on the take.

– the actual amount of money that someone spends for something

My out-of-pocket expenses for the business trip were very low.

– to add false expenses to a bill

The plumber who was fixing our plumbing system was padding the bill so we got a new plumber.

– to make another person decide something, to put the responsibility or blame on someone else

Our supervisor always passes the buck and he will never take responsibility for what he does.

– to collect money for something (sometimes by passing a hat around to put the money into)

We passed the hat to collect some money for the party.

pay a king’s ransom (for something)

– to pay a great deal for something

I had to pay a king’s ransom for a ticket to the final basketball game.

pay an arm and a leg for (something)

– to pay a high price for something

I paid an arm and a leg for my car but I am not very happy with it.

– to pay for things as they occur (rather than on credit)

I will have to pay as I go if I go to graduate school next year.

– to pay for something before you get or use it

I must pay in advance for the bus company to deliver my boxes.

pay off (someone) or pay (someone) off

– to pay someone a bribe for something

The owner of the store had to pay off the gang who were threatening him.

pay off (something) or pay (something) off

– to pay the total amount of something

I paid off my student loan after one year of work.

pay one’s own way

– to pay the costs for something yourself

The young girl paid her own way through college.

– to face the results of one’s actions, to be punished for something

The city government was forced to pay the piper after many years of bad management.
The student wasted most of the term playing. He was forced to pay the piper when the professor assigned much work at the end of the term.

pay through the nose

– to pay a very high price, to pay too much

I paid through the nose when I had to buy gasoline in the small town.

I had to pay up my parking tickets or I would lose my driving license.

The mayor received a payoff and was forced to resign from his position.

pennies from heaven

– money that you do not expect to get

The money that I received from the government was like pennies from heaven and I was very happy.

penny for one`s thoughts

– a request that asks someone what he or she is thinking about

“I will give you a penny for your thoughts,” I said to my friend who was looking out of the window.

– a person who is very careful with his or her money – even very small amounts like a single penny

The man is a penny pincher and will never spend any money.

a penny saved is a penny earned

– saving money by not spending it is the same as earning money from working

A penny saved is a penny earned and it is better to be thrifty sometimes than to only work more hours.

penny-wise and pound foolish

– to be careful or thrifty in small expenditures but careless or wasteful in large ones

My friend is penny-wise and pound foolish and she economizes on small things but wastes much money on big things.

pick up the tab/check

– to pay the bill for something

I picked up the tab for my sister and her children at the restaurant.

– a small bank or container for saving money that is sometimes in the shape of a pig

The small boy saved much money in his piggy bank.

– to be careful with money, to be thrifty

My grandmother always pinches pennies and never spends her money foolishly.

play the market

– to invest in the stock market

My father likes to play the market and he sometimes makes a lot of money.

I had to pony up a lot of money to get my car repaired.

pour money down the drain

The man is pouring money down the drain by always repairing his old car.

put in one`s two cents (worth)

– to add one’s comments or opinion to a discussion

I stood up in the meeting and put in my two cents worth before I sat down.

put one’s money where one’s mouth is

– to stop talking about something and do it, to stop talking and make a bet on something

I was forced to put my money where my mouth is and either go to Europe or stop talking about it.

put the bite on (someone)

– to try to get money from someone

The young man often puts the bite on his father before the weekend.

– some money earned quickly and easily

The small company is only interested in making a quick buck and is not interested in product quality.

– to say in advance how much something will cost

I asked the salesman to quote a price for the new product.

– a promise to repeat an invitation at a later date

I decided to take a rain check and will go to the restaurant with my friend another time.

– to increase your demands or the amount that you spend for something (the ante is the amount of money each player puts on the table before starting a game of cards or poker)

The union raised the ante with the company when they said that they were going to go on strike.

rake in the money

– to make a lot of money

We have been raking in the money at our restaurant since it opened.

rake off (some money) or rake (some money) off

– to steal a portion of a payment or money

The cashiers were raking off some of the money from the store.

– a small sum of money (usually used in the negative)

I would not give a red cent for my neighbor’s car.

rolling in money

– to have lots of money

The man is rolling in money and he always has much money to spend.

salt away (money) or salt (money) away

My uncle salted away thousands of dollars before he died.

save up (for something)

– to save money in order to buy something

I am saving up for a new television set.

scrape (something) together or scrape together (something)

– to save small amounts of money (usually with some difficulty) for something

We scraped together some money and bought a present for our friend.

scrimp and save

– to spend little money in order to save for something

The woman has been scrimping and saving to buy a new car.

see the color of (someone’s) money

– to make sure that someone has enough money for something

I will not give the man the product until I see the color of his money.

set (someone) back or set back (someone)

– to cost a certain amount of money

My friend asked me how much my new coat had set me back.

shake (someone) down or shake down (someone)

– to blackmail or extract money from someone

The gang tried to shake down the owner of the small store.

shell out (money) or shell (money) out

– to pay money for something

My father shelled out a lot of money to get his house painted.

sitting on a goldmine

– to own something very valuable (and often not realize this)

My sister is sitting on a goldmine with her collection of antiques.

smart money is on (someone or something)

– people who know about money or business think that someone or something is good

The smart money is on the government to introduce the new law this week.

sock away (some money or something) or sock (some money or something) away

– to save or store some money or something

I am trying to sock away some money for my holiday.

spend money hand over fist

– to spend money fast and in large amounts

My friend is spending money hand over fist.

splurge on (something)

– to spend more money than one might ordinarily spend

We decided to splurge and go to a nice restaurant for dinner.

square accounts with (someone)

– to settle one’s financial accounts with someone

I went to the small store to square accounts with the owner.

squirrel away (some money) or squirrel (some money) away

– to save some money

I was able to squirrel away much money from my previous job.

– to have no money

My friend is stone broke and will not be able to come to the movie with us.

strapped for cash

– to have little or no money available

I am strapped for cash at the moment so I will not be able to go on a holiday.

– to find or do something that makes you rich

The company was able to strike gold with their new product.

– to suddenly become rich or successful

My grandfather struck it rich when he was young but when he died he had no money.

– to lose much money

My friend took a beating on the stock market and has now stopped buying stocks.

take the money and run

– to accept what is offered to you before the offer is gone

I plan to take the money and run as I do not believe that I will get any more money for the settlement of my car accident.

take up a collection

– to collect money for something

We plan to take up a collection for the wife of the dead manager.

throw good money after bad

– to waste additional money after already wasting money on the same thing

I do not want to throw good money after bad so I will not pay any more money to fix my car.

throw money around

– to spend a lot of money without worrying if you are wasting it

The government is throwing much money around as they prepare for the large exhibition.

throw money at (something)

– to spend a lot of money for a project or something without thinking about how the money should be spent

The city plans to throw a lot of money at the project to fix the stadium roof.

tidy sum of money

– a rather large amount of money

I was able to get a tidy sum of money from the sale of my business.

tighten one`s belt

– to live on less money than usual

We decided to tighten our belt and try to save up some money for a holiday.

tightfisted (with money)

– to be very stingy with money

My uncle is very tightfisted with money and does not want to spend any at all.

– time is valuable so do not waste it

Time is money and I do not want to waste time talking to our supervisor because she always wants to argue with me.

– to turn in a very tight turn, to change directions or circumstances in a short time

The small car is very flexible and is able to turn on a dime.

– twenty-five cents, a quarter of a dollar

The newspaper cost two bits a copy.

two cents (worth)

– one’s comments or opinion

I gave my two cents worth when my supervisor asked me for my opinion.

– to increase your demands or the amount that you spend for something (the ante is the amount of money each player puts on the table before starting a game of cards or poker)

The company upped the ante in their bid to buy the other company.

(not) worth a cent/dime/a red cent/a plugged nickel/two cents

– to be not worth anything, to be not of any value

The antique desk is not worth a dime although everybody thinks it is very valuable.

worth its weight in gold

– to be very valuable

The new secretary is very smart and she is worth her weight in gold.

worth one`s salt

– to be worth what one is paid

Our secretary is worth her salt and is a great asset to our company.

Cash Idioms

– selling something for cash only and with no delivery

We were able to get a good price on a sofa in a cash-and-carry deal at the furniture store.

cash in (something) or cash (something) in

– to exchange coupons or bonds for their value in money

I cashed in my savings bonds in order to get some money to buy a car.

cash in on (something)

– to make money from an opportunity

The former basketball player cashed in on his popularity to open a very successful restaurant.

cash in one`s chips

– to exchange or sell something to get some money (from the chips used in a poker game)

I decided to cash in my chips and go back to school.

cash on the barrelhead

– money paid in cash when something is bought

I gave the salesman cash on the barrelhead for the used car.

– cash or coins or bills

I paid for the stereo in cold hard cash.

strapped for cash

– to have little or no money available

I am strapped for cash at the moment so I will not be able to go on a holiday.

Check Idioms

cut (someone) a check

– to write a check (usually used for a company which automatically produces a check with a computer)

The company cut me a check to pay for my extra work.

give (someone) a blank check

– to let someone act as they want or as they think is necessary (like a check that has the amount left blank)

The city gave the new department a blank check to try and solve the homeless problem.

honor (someone’s) check

– to accept someone’s personal check

The bank refused to honor my check for the apartment rent.

make a check out to (someone)

– to write a check with someone’s name on it

I made a check out to the man who repaired my bathroom.

– a promise to repeat an invitation at a later date

I decided to take a rain check and will go to the restaurant with my friend another time.

Dime Idioms

– easy to get and therefore of little value

Used computers are a dime a dozen and they have little value.

nickel and dime (someone)

– to charge many small amounts of money (which eventually equal a large amount of money)

The small repairs on my car are beginning to nickel and dime me.

– in a very small space

I had to turn my car on a dime after I entered the parking lot.

– to turn in a very tight turn, to change directions or circumstances in a short time

The small car is very flexible and is able to turn on a dime.

(not) worth a dime

– to be not worth anything, to be not of any value

The antique desk is not worth a dime although everyone thinks it is very valuable.

Dollar Idioms

– money when it is viewed as more important than anything else

The man spent most of his life chasing the almighty dollar.

as phony as a three-dollar bill

– phony, not genuine

The man who was asking for donations for the charity was as phony as a three-dollar bill.

as sound as a dollar

– very secure and dependable

The company president believes that his business is as sound as a dollar.

bet one`s bottom dollar

– to bet all that one has on something because you are sure that you will win

I would bet my bottom dollar that the accounting manager will be late again today.

– one`s last dollar

The man spent his bottom dollar on some new clothes to wear for his job interview.

dollar for dollar

– considering the cost

Dollar for dollar the new hotel is the best bargain in this city for tourists.

feel like a million dollars/bucks

– to feel wonderful, to feel well and healthy

Although I have been sick for a few weeks I feel like a million dollars today.

look like a million dollars

– to look very good

The woman looked like a million dollars when she went to accept the award.

Penny/Cent Idioms

cost a pretty penny

– to cost a lot of money

It is going to cost a pretty penny to get my car fixed.

cut (someone) off without a penny

– to stop giving someone a regular amount of money, to leave someone no money in a will

The wealthy businessman cut his son off without a penny when the young man refused to work hard.

(not) have two cents to rub together

– to not have much money

My friend does not have two cents to rub together and he is always broke.

pennies from heaven

– money that you do not expect to get

The money that I received from the government was like pennies from heaven and I was very happy.

penny for one`s thoughts

– a request that asks someone what he or she is thinking about

“I will give you a penny for your thoughts,” I said to my friend who was looking out of the window.

a penny saved is a penny earned

– saving money by not spending it is the same as earning money from working

A penny saved is a penny earned and it is better to be thrifty sometimes than to only work more hours.

penny-wise and pound foolish

– to be careful or thrifty in small expenditures but careless or wasteful in large ones

My friend is penny-wise and pound foolish and she economizes on small things but wastes much money on big things.

– to be careful with money, to be thrifty

My grandmother always pinches pennies and never spends her money foolishly.

put in one`s two cents (worth)

– to add one’s comments or opinion to a discussion

I stood up in the meeting and put in my two cents worth before I sat down.

– a small sum of money (usually used in the negative)

I would not give a red cent for my neighbor’s car.

two cents (worth)

– one’s comments or opinion

I gave my two cents worth when my supervisor asked me for my opinion.

(not) worth a cent/a red cent/two cents

– to be not worth anything, to be not of any value

The antique desk is not worth two cents although everybody thinks it is very valuable.

Idiom Quizzes – Money


    Choose the correct idiom to replace the expression in the brackets:

My sister’s husband is (in good financial condition) after many financial problems last year.

(a) cooking the books
(b) betting his bottom dollar
(c) back on his feet
(d) bringing home the bacon

I spent my (last small amount of savings) on a ticket for a basketball game.

(a) bottom dollar
(b) cold hard cash
(c) money to burn
(d) kickback

My father worked hard all of his life (earning the family living).

(a) passing the buck
(b) paying through the nose
(c) stone broke
(d) bringing home the bacon

I decided to (sell all of my belongings) and go and work overseas.

(a) strike it rich
(b) cash in my chips
(c) put in my two cents
(d) tighten my belt

I was (out of money) at the supermarket and I could not pay for my groceries.

(a) pinching pennies
(b) padding the bill
(c) caught short
(d) laying away money

Everybody in our class (contributed) some money for the New Year’s party.

(a) cleaned up
(b) cashed in
(c) salted away
(d) chipped in

You can often buy used pocket books for (a very cheap price).

(a) a dime a dozen
(b) an arm and a leg
(c) pay dirt
(d) a piggy bank

I was (without money) many times when I first started working.

(a) raking in the money
(b) worth my salt
(c) laying away money
(d) flat broke

My neighbor seems to be (short of money) at the moment.

(a) loaded
(b) deadbeat
(c) hard up
(d) in the black

Our company has been (losing money) for over three years now.

(a) making a killing
(b) in the red
(c) on a dime
(d) putting in their two cents worth

My friend made (a lot of money) when he was working in the oil industry.

(a) a bundle
(b) ends meet
(c) a piggy bank
(d) a living

We were able to buy the house (very cheaply) so we decided to try to buy it immediately.

(a) worth our salt
(b) stone broke
(c) for a song
(d) on a dime

My sister went to Las Vegas and (won a lot of money) at the casino.

(a) made ends meet
(b) lost her shirt
(c) greased her palm
(d) hit the jackpot

That man is (very rich) but he never likes to spend his money.

(a) cut-rate
(b) loaded
(c) cooking the books
(d) in the whole

The woman with the three children is having a difficult time to (pay her bills).

(a) make ends meet
(b) bet her bottom dollar
(c) feel like a million bucks
(d) make a bundle

The company president received (some illegal money) from the contractor who wanted to get the building contract.

(a) a red cent
(b) a quick buck
(c) a kickback
(d) a rain check

My father (lost most of his money) on the stock market.

(a) burnt a hole in his pocket
(b) lost his shirt
(c) picked up the tab
(d) padded the bill

The family has (more money than they need) so they often go on a nice holiday.

(a) cold hard cash
(b) chicken feed
(c) bet on the wrong horse
(d) money to burn

The drinks were (paid for by the owner) as it was the tenth anniversary of the restaurant.

(a) on the house
(b) on a shoestring
(c) strapped for cash
(d) penny-wise and pound foolish

My sister and her husband paid (much money) for their house.

(a) on a shoestring
(b) a rain check
(c) an arm and a leg
(d) in kind

The woman is always (very careful with her money) and keeps a very strict budget.

(a) worth her salt
(b) padding the bill
(c) putting in her two cents
(d) pinching pennies

I had to (pay) some money for the health club fees when I joined the club.

(a) pony up
(b) break even
(c) pay off
(d) salt away

My friend asked me how much my new car had (cost).

(a) taken a beating
(b) picked up the tab
(c) made ends meet
(d) set me back

I tried hard to give my (opinion) but I was unable to do so.

(a) gravy train
(b) layaway plan
(c) two cents worth
(d) cheapskate

I had to (live on less money than usual) after I quit my part-time job.

(a) break even
(b) tighten my belt
(c) ante up
(d) make money hand over fist

When I got an increase in salary I (spent some extra money) on a big meal.

(a) struck it rich
(b) tightened my belt
(c) passed the buck
(d) splurged

We were able to (save) enough money to pay for the new kitchen in our house.

(a) throw around
(b) ante up
(c) scrape together
(d) fork over

I will take a (promise to meet again) as I cannot go to the movie with my friend tonight.

(a) rain check
(b) red cent
(c) quick buck
(d) nest egg

The little boy has been putting money in a (small container) to save for a new bicycle.

(a) layaway plan
(b) piggy bank
(c) kickback
(d) Dutch treat

The salesman was (putting false expenses) on his expense account so we decided to fire him.

(a) footing the bill
(b) in the red
(c) picking up the tab
(d) padding the bill

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